Luis Barragán House and Studio World Heritage Site (Mexico)

Luis Barragán House and Studio World Heritage Site (Mexico)

Fri, 01/04/2019 - 21:45
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Built in 1948, the House and Studio of architect Luis Barragán in the suburbs of Mexico City represents an outstanding example of the architect’s creative work in the post-Second World War period. Barragán created a regional adaptation of the International Modern Movement in architectural design.

The Luis Barragán House and Studio, built in 1947-1948, is located in a working class suburb of Mexico City. This World Heritage Site represents an outstanding example of the architect’s creative work in the post-Second World War period.

Luis Barragán created a regional adaptation of the International Modern Movement in architectural design. The concrete building, totaling 1,161 sq m (12,500 sq ft), consists of a ground floor and two upper stories, as well as a small private garden.

The architect’s integration of modern design with traditional Mexican vernacular elements has been greatly influential, especially in the contemporary design of gardens. For example, his use of water and fountains reflects Mediterranean and Islamic traditions, in particular Moroccan. The house and studio of Luis Barragán owes its singularity to being a personal and therefore unique reflection of its designer.

This autobiographical background did not prevent this artist manifesto from going well beyond its time and its cultural milieu and becoming a distinguished reference in 20th century fine art and architecture. Of particular note is the profound dialogue between light and constructed space and the way in which color is substantial to form and materials.

It is a house which appeals to all the senses and re-evaluates the ways in which architecture can be perceived and enjoyed by its inhabitants. Many of its materials were found in traditional architecture and, distant as they are from industrial production, they reveal the aging of the house with a patina which the architect acknowledged as the poetic value of his architecture.