Amazonia National Park (Brazil)

Amazonia National Park (Brazil)

Sun, 11/17/2019 - 20:26
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Amazonia National Park is located in Pará state in north-central Brazil and is situated along the Tapajós River, covering about 3,300 sq mi. Consisting of dense humid tropical forest, the park contains an extremely biodiverse habitat.

Amazonia National Park is located in Pará state in north-central Brazil and is situated along the Tapajós River. The park contains an extremely biodiverse habitat. The habitat is dense lowland rain forest and there are areas of white-sand grasslands beside the upper reaches of the Tapajós.

Established in 1974, the oldest national park in the Amazon, it has gradually expanded to cover about 3,300 sq mi (8,600 sq km). Known as the "Green Inferno", Amazonia National Park covers almost 40% of Brazil's landmass, including seven of Brazil's 27 states. The specific objectives of the park are the preservation of various Amazonic ecosystems, through scientific, educational and recreational means.

Amazonia National Park lies on either side of the Tapajós River. This river rises in the Precambrian crystalline shields area of ancient igneous rock and carries little sediment. The river acts as a barrier so that some of the animals and plants on one bank are not found on the other.

To the west, the park adjoins the 827,877 ha (2,045,730 acre) Pau-Rosa National Forest, created in 2001. The proposed South Amazon Ecotones Ecological Corridor would link the park to other protected areas and indigenous territories in the region and serve as a transition between the south of the Amazon Rainforest and the north of the Brazilian Cerrado. An "ecotone" is a transition area between two biomes.

Except for about 2% of more open forest, the park consists of dense humid tropical forest. The larger trees reach a height of about 50 m (160 ft), and the light filtering through the canopy is sufficient to produce a biodiverse understory of vines, lichens, mosses and orchids.

Many of the mammals in the park are nocturnal and some such as the giant otter, Amazonian manatee and giant anteater are endangered. There are also large numbers of reptiles and fish.