Madidi National Park (Bolivia)

Madidi National Park (Bolivia)

Tue, 12/29/2020 - 15:15
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Madidi National Park is located in the upper Amazon River basin of Bolivia, close to the borders with Peru and Brazil. The park is located in one of Earth's most biologically diverse regions that ranges from glacier-covered Andean Mountain peaks to tropical rain forests.

Madidi National Park

Madidi National Park is located in the upper Amazon River basin of northwestern Bolivia, close to the borders with Peru and Brazil. Established in 1995, it covers an area of approximately 19,000 sq km (7,300 sq mi).

The park is located in one of Earth's most biologically diverse regions that ranges from glacier-covered Andean Mountain peaks to tropical rain forests. Madidi, in particular, protects parts of the Bolivian Yungas and Bolivian montane dry forests ecoregions.

The climate is cold in the alpine region, temperate in areas of intermediate elevation and tropical in the northern lowlands.

Madidi National Park is part of one of the largest protected regions in the world. Nearby protected areas (though not necessarily contiguous) include:

Renowned for its astounding array of flora and fauna, the park boasts thousands of species of plants and wildlife: insects (over 120,000 species), mammals (272 species), fish (496 species), reptiles (204 species), amphibians (213 species) as well as more than 8,000 species of vascular plants.

Mammals include jaguars, sloths, vicuñas, pumas, spectacled bears, pink river dolphins, otters, peccaries and the recently discovered titi monkey.

The park is also home to a large portion of Bolivia’s avian population. It’s estimated that over 1,200 species of birds exist here, representing 14% of all bird species worldwide.

Madidi National Park is home to 46 indigenous communities from six different tribes: the Tacana, Ese Ejja, Tsimané, Mosetén, and the voluntarily isolated Toromona.

Over the last 50 years the Quechua and Aymara groups of Bolivia’s Andean highlands have been migrating to the Madidi region, competing with the native lowland tribes.

One of the threats against the Madidi National Park is the proposed hydroelectric dam project at the Beni River in the Bala Gorge, where the Beni River breaks through the Bala Mountain Range. The on-again, off-again project would cause the flooding of approximately 2,000 sq km (770 sq mi) of protected area.