Colombian Andes: Andean Natural Region (Colombia)

Colombian Andes: Andean Natural Region (Colombia)

Fri, 07/09/2021 - 17:00

The Andean Natural Region is the most populated natural region of Colombia, containing most of the country's urban centers. The Colombian Andes consists of three parallel mountain chains: Cordillera Occidental, Cordillera Central and Cordillera Oriental.

Colombian Andes

In the south of Colombia, just north of the border with Ecuador, the Andes Mountains divide into three parallel mountain chains (Cordilleras). These ranges, which trend generally north and south are known as the Occidental (western), Central (middle) and Oriental (eastern).

The three ranges, from south to north, begin at the Huaca Knot, a group of snow-capped volcanoes. Further north is the Pasto mountain knot which is an important source of many of Colombia's rivers. The three cordilleras begin here.

These ranges are often separated by deep intermediate depressions. Other small mountain chains rise on the sides of the main ranges.

The Colombian Andes is considered part of the Tropical Andes, a climate-delineated region of the Andes mountain sytem.

Cordillera Occidental

The Cordillera Occidental, the westernmost range and running parallel to the coast, is the least populated of the three cordilleras. The average altitude is 2,000 m (6,600 ft) and the highest peak is Cerro Tatamá at 4,100 m (13,500 ft).

The range extends from south to north eventually receding in three smaller ranges into the Caribbean plain and the Sinú River Valley. The relatively low elevation of the cordillera permits dense vegetation, which on the western slopes is truly tropical.

The Cordillera Occidental is separated from the coastal Baudó Mountains by the Atrato River and from the Cordillera Central by the deep rift of the Cauca Valley.

Map showing location of Cordillera Occidental in Colombia

Map showing location of Cordillera Occidental in Colombia

Cordillera Central

The Cordillera Central exhibits the highest elevations of the three branches of the Colombian Andes. The range is a north and south trending 800 km- (500 mi-) long wall of rock that is dotted with snow-covered volcanoes.

Most of the volcanoes of the zone are in this range. The highest peaks incluide Nevado del Tolima at 5,215 m (17,105 ft), Nevado del Ruiz at 5,400 m (17,717 ft) and Nevado del Huila 5,750 m (18,865 ft).

At about latitude 6° N, the range widens into a plateau. This is where the city of Medellín is situated, Colombia's second largest city.

The Cordillera Central is bounded by the Cauca River Valley in the west and the Magdalena River Valley in the east. Toward its northern end, the cordillera separates into several branches that descend toward the Caribbean coast.

Map showing location of Cordillera Central in Colombia

Map showing location of Cordillera Central in Colombia

Cordillera Oriental

The Cordillera Oriental, the easternmost range, is the widest of the three branches of the Colombian Andes. It extends south to north where it splits into the Serranía del Perijá and the Cordillera de Mérida in the Venezuelan Andes. The highest peak is Ritacuba Blanco at 5,410 m (17,750 ft) in the Sierra Nevada del Cocuy.

Located in this range is the Altiplano Cundiboyacense, a high plateau that covers parts of the departments of Cundinamarca and Boyacá. The altiplano corresponds to the ancient territory of the Muisca. The Colombian capital of Bogotá is located here.

To the west of the Cordillera Oriental is the Magdalena River Basin. The basins of the Amazon River, Orinoco River and Catatumbo River are located to the east of the range.

Map showing location of Cordillera Oriental in Colombia

Map showing location of Cordillera Oriental in Colombia

Andean Natural Region

The Andean Natural Region is the most populated natural region of Colombia. Along with its many mountains, it contains most of the country's urban centers. These urban centers were also the location of the most significant pre-Columbian indigenous settlements.

Beyond the Colombian Massif in the southwestern departments of Cauca and Nariño, the Colombian Andes divide into three branches:

  • The Cordillera Occidental runs adjacent to the Pacific coast and is home to the city of Cali.

  • The Cordillera Central runs up the center of the country between the Cauca and Magdalena river valleys (to the west and east respectively) and includes the cities of Medellín, Manizales and Pereira.

  • The Cordillera Oriental extends northeast towards the Guajira Peninsula and includes the cities of Bogotá, Bucaramanga and Cúcuta.

The Andean Natural Region has a wide range of temperature zones, therefore the vegetation of the region varies considerably, according to altitude.

  • Terre caliente (warm land) primarily consists of river valleys and basins below 1,000 m (3,280 ft) in elevation.

  • Tierra templada (temperate land) is generally found at elevations between 1,000 and 2,000 m (3,280 and 6,560 ft).

  • Tierra fría (cold land), at elevations between 2,000 to 3,200 m (6,560 to 10,500 ft), includes the most productive land and most of the population.

  • The alpine conditions of the zona forestada (forested zone) exist at 3,200 m to 3,900 m (10,500 to 12,800 ft), páramos at 3,900 m to 4,600 m (12,800 to 15,100 ft) and tierra helada (frozen land) at 4,600 m (15,100 ft) and above.

Numerous Colombian National Parks are located in the Andean natural region.

Map showing location of Andean Natural Region of Colombia

Map showing the location of the Andean Natural Region of Colombia