Peru–Chile Trench (South America)

Peru–Chile Trench (South America)

Wed, 10/23/2019 - 11:21

The Peru–Chile Trench, also known as the Atacama Trench, is an oceanic trench in the eastern Pacific Ocean off the coast of Peru and Chile. It delineates the boundary between the subducting Nazca Plate and the overriding South American Plate.

The Peru–Chile Trench, also known as the Atacama Trench, is an oceanic trench in the eastern Pacific Ocean, about 160 km (100 mi) off the coast of Peru and Chile. It delineates the boundary between the subducting Nazca Plate and the overriding South American Plate.

The trench reaches a maximum depth of 8,065 m (26,460 ft) below sea level in "Richards Deep" and is approximately 5,900 km (3,666 mi) long; its mean width is 64 km (40 mi) and it covers an expanse of some 590,000 sq km (228,000 sq mi).

The trench is a result of a convergent boundary, where the eastern edge of the oceanic Nazca Plate is being subducted beneath the continental South American Plate.

The subduction of the Nazca Plate below the South American Plate along the Chile-Peru Trench is associated with numerous earthquakes.