Cutervo National Park (Peru)

Cutervo National Park (Peru)

Thu, 01/17/2019 - 19:34
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Cutervo National Park is Peru's oldest protected area, located in the northern Peruvian Andes. It was created to preserve flora and fauna diversity and the archaeological remains of the Cordillera de Tarros, which is home to the last cloud forests of Cajamarca and various ecosystems of native species.

Cutervo National Park is Peru's oldest protected area, located in the northern Peruvian Andes. The park occupies an area called Cordillera de Tarros in the Cajamarca region. Established in 1961, it was created to preserve flora and fauna diversity and the archaeological remains of the Cordillera de Tarros, which is home to the last cloud forests of Cajamarca and various ecosystems of native species.

The park was extended to 8,214 ha (20,297 acres) and protects areas of Andean montane forests and paramo for headwater conservation. These areas are the habitat of animal species like the spectacled bear, the mountain tapir, and the oilbird; as well as plant species like the Andean wax palms.

The most prominent geographical feature, at the highest elevation in the park, is the mountain range Cordillera de Tarros. This mountain has several caves and is the origin of several streams. Elevations inside the park range between 1,550 and 3,500 m (5,000 and 11,500 ft above sea level.

The park protects part of the Peruvian Yungas ecoregion. A variety of ecological communities exist within the park including wet montane forests, high-elevation grasslands above 3000 m (9,850 ft), rivers, and small lakes.

Human occupation in the area dates back to the pre-Columbian era. Archaeological remains are present inside the national park, primarily within the El Perolito Archaeological Site.

Over seven hundred species of vascular plants have been recorded in the park. Many are broadleaved trees (e.g.: Chionanthus pubescens, Cornus peruviana, Hedyosmum scabrum, Morus insignis, Ocotea arnottiana, Prunus integrifolia, Polylepis multijuga, Vallea stipularis, etc.), conifer (Podocarpus oleifolius) and palm trees (e.g.: Ceroxylon spp.). Orchids are represented by 88 recorded morphospecies

The park is home to mammal species facing risk of extinction such as the neotropical otter, the mountain tapir, the spectacled bear, the mountain paca, the giant anteater, and a species of wild cat (Leopardus colocolo). Bird species like the oilbird, the golden-headed quetzal, and the Andean cock-of-the-rock are also live within the park.[1] A species of catfish (Astroblepus rosei) can be seen in the underground streams of the caves inside the park.

Forests in the area are covered by clouds and fog almost year-round. The park's average annual rainfall is more than 800 mm (31 in), and the maximum annual rainfall is almost 2,000 mm (79 in). The temperature is between 18 - 23 °C (64 - 73 °F) at 1,000 - 2,000 m (3,280 - 6,560 ft), between 14 - 18 °C (57 - 64 °F) at 2,000 - 2,500 m (6,560 - 8,200 ft), and between 7 - 14 °C (45 - 57 °F) at 2,500 - 3,500 m (8,200 - 11,500 ft).