Maipo Valley: Wine Producing Region (Chile)

Maipo Valley: Wine Producing Region (Chile)

Mon, 08/22/2022 - 19:15

The Maipo Valley is one of Chile's most important wine-producing regions. Located at the very northern end of Chile's extensive Central Valley, the region extends eastwards from the city of Santiago, Chile's capital, to the Andes and westward toward the Pacific coast.

Maipo Valley

Maipo Valley is one of Chile's most important wine-producing regions. Often described as the "Bordeaux of South America," the historic valley is the birthplace of the Chilean wine industry.

This is the home of viticulture in Chile. The first vines were planted around Santiago at the city's birth in the 1540s but it wasn't until the 1800s that viticulture began to expand significantly.

Today, the Maipo Valley region features over 3,000 ha (7,400 acres) of vineyards, more than half of which are dedicated to producing Cabernet Sauvignon or Cabernet blends. However, a wide range of grape varieties are planted here; including Merlot, Syrah, Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc.

Located at the very northern end of Chile's extensive Central Valley, the region extends eastwards from the city of Santiago, Chile's capital, to the Andes and westward toward the Pacific coast. It stretches toward the towns and subzones of Padre Hurtado, Peñaflor, Talagante, Isla de Maipo and Melipilla.

The Coastal Range separates the region from the Pacific coast, and on the eastern side, the Andes Mountains rise suddenly and dramatically, separating Maipo from the Argentinean region of Mendoza.

Maipo Valley can be roughly separated into three subregions: Upper Maipo (Alto Maipo), Central Maipo (Maipo Medio) and Lower Maipo (Maipo Bajo).

Upper Maipo

The Upper Maipo (Alto Maipo) subregion runs along the eastern edge of the Andes Mountains. These foothills, rising from 400 to 800 m (1,300 to 2,600 ft) asl, are strongly influenced by the mountainous climate.

At this height, warm sun during the day is followed by colder nights, which slow ripening. This extends the growing season, leading to grapes with a balance of ripeness and acidity.

The area's colluvial soils (brought down from the mountains by water erosion or landslides) are rocky and free-draining. The climate, combined with the poor, porous and rocky soil, puts the vines under stress, producing a characteristically bold, elegant Cabernet Sauvignon.

Upper Maipo, which encompasses the subregions of Puente Alto and Pirque, is the most prestigious of the viticultural areas.

Central Maipo

The Central Maipo (Maipo Medio) subregion occupies the lower-lying area to the west of the Upper Maipo subregion, surrounding the towns of Buin and Paine. This is one of the oldest winemaking areas in Chile and was the first part of the Maipo Valley to be settled.

The climate here is the warmest and driest of the three subregions. Here, less rainfall requires the use of drip irrigation. Vineyards are often planted along the Maipo River, an area known for its alluvial soils.

The slightly warmer climate and more clay-based and fertile soils lead to a slightly less refined style of wine. Cabernet Sauvignon is still the most-grown grape variety but there are also substantial plantings of Carmenère vines which are well suited to this iconic Chilean grape variety.

Lower Maipo

Lower Maipo, or Pacific Maipo, is the youngest wine-producing area in the Maipo Valley region and is centered in the towns of Isla de Maipo and Talagante. The wine industry here is more concerned with winemaking than viticulture, and while there are a few vineyards, there are many wineries.

Grapes grown in this region benefit from the coastal influence of the Pacific Ocean as well as the alluvial soils also found in the area. Red wines from this subregion have a refreshing, natural acidity from the influence of the ocean.

The vineyards in this area tend to be tucked up against some of the smaller, low-lying hills that rise between the Andes and the Coastal Range so that they are protected from the harsh winds coming off the coast.

Some viticulture takes place here near the river, where cool breezes create mesoclimates suitable for growing white-wine varieties, as well as Cabernet Sauvignon.

Because of the region’s coastal influence, Lower Maipo is also a popular place for experimentation with the country’s white varieties, most notably Sauvignon Blanc.