Cerrado Biosphere Reserve (Brazil)

Cerrado Biosphere Reserve (Brazil)

Thu, 05/14/2020 - 17:01
Posted in:

The Cerrado Biosphere Reserve is defined by the Cerrado biome, which includes dense savanna woodlands, twisted short trees and bushes, and grasslands. It is located in the Brazilian states of Goiás, Tocantins, Maranhão, Piauí, and the Federal District.

Cerrado Biosphere Reserve

The Cerrado Biosphere Reserve is defined by the Cerrado biome, which includes dense savanna woodlands, twisted short trees and bushes, and grasslands. It is located in the Brazilian states of Goiás, Tocantins, Maranhão, Piauí, and the Federal District.

The second largest vegetation formation in South America, the Cerrado covers one-fourth of Brazil’s land area. The Cerrado Biosphere Reserve has an area of 296,500 sq km (114,480 sq mi).

It is one of six Brazilian Biosphere Reserves recognized by UNESCO, including the Atlantic Forest, São Paulo Green Belt, Pantanal, Caatinga, and the Central Amazon.

The Cerrado is home to surprisingly beautiful, exotic landscapes and cultures with significant economic and tourism potential. It is the site of a profusion of natural grasslands, savannas, palm swamps, and forests enhanced by many streams and waterfalls. It is an essential water source and a scene of natural and cultural beauty.

The upland grass beds of Chapada dos Veadeiros and the Paraná River valley wetlands harbor unique species. The deciduous and semi-deciduous forests, with hardwoods that are prized for cattle fencing and construction, are also a high priority for biodiversity conservation.

The conservation of the Cerrado Biosphere Reserve focuses on the restoration of altered areas and the building of ecological corridors. Over 200,000 people live in the Biosphere Reserve, engaged in ecotourism, production, and commerce of native fruit pulps.

The Cerrado Fruits Project is an economic alternative developed by the Timbira communities and their regional neighbors. It aims at income generation, biodiversity, conservation, and economic sustainability. Native fruits, such as cashew, bacury, buriti palm, and hog-plum are collected, frozen, and packaged for sale.

The Biosphere Reserve is managed by a consortium system of different economic, rural planning, and conservation actors at the State level, with the scientific backing of numerous universities and institutions.